Impact of the Contextual Approach on the Qur’ānic Interpretations: An Analytical Study

  • Dr Muhammad Samiullah Faraz University of Management and Technology Lahore
  • Syeda Asiya University of Management & Technology, Lahore.
Keywords: Al-Qur’ān, Sharī‘ah, modernity, contextual approach, beliefs and practices, social justice

Abstract

Abstract

The contextual approach, according to contextualists, is the best methodology for cognizing the true spirit and the real message of the Qur’ān, as it provides such interpretations that are based on the values of equality, fairness and justice. The contextualists assert that they seek to promote an Islam which is more human-centred, peaceful and flexible. They also regard most of the classical Qur’ānic explanations, especially pertaining to certain social issues (like the Rights of Women, Interfaith Relations and Hudūd Punishments), to be historic, specific and context-based. They argue that to determine the relevance of the Qur’ānic teachings today, such interpretations should be re-understood, re-interpreted and re-applied according to the modern context and demands. They contextualize the Qur’anic interpretations on the name of modernity, rationality, liberty, success and universality. This article aims to understand the contextual approach as well as its impact on the Qur’ānic interpretations. The thoughts and philosophy of Fazlur Rahman, the twentieth-century leading proponent of the contextual approach, are the major focus of this study. This study is an attempt to help the Muslims remove the evolving misunderstandings about Islam and stimulate them to implement the Qur’ānic wisdom in their thoughts and lives in a better way.

 

References

References

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In traditional Fiqh, the interpreter looks at the similarities between the past and the contemporary situations, and then tries to apply the ruling or value linked with the precedent on to the modern one.
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As, each Sūrah of the Qur’ān (excluding Sūrah Tauba) begins with this acknowledgement.
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“They ask you about intoxicants and games of chance. Say: In both of them there is a great sin and means of profit for men” (Al-Qur’ān 2:219). Those who want to defend drinking wine, refer to this part of this verse, “intoxicants … means of profit for men”. By reading this single verse, they also claim that this is just advice and there is no such Āyah in the Qur’ān which clearly and strictly forbids the consumption of intoxicants.
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These amended laws restricted polygamy and gave such rights to women, not supported by the text and the classical Islamic law.
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Published
2020-12-27